The following post is in reference to a survey given in May 2018. For more information, see previous posts on our Survey Methodology and Survey Questions & Reflections (the full survey is available for download and reuse under a CC0 license).


In May, we put out a survey to Penn faculty, staff, and graduate students in order to learn more about how they create, disseminate, and reuse scholarly works in anticipation of changes to library services and platforms for scholarly communication. We received 412 total responses; 289 completed the survey in full (see below for a breakdown of partial responses). Of those who fully completed the survey, we heard from 173 faculty, 74 staff, and 52 graduate students (note that a few respondents held multiple types of positions). Although we did hear from every school, the majority of respondents came from Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences. 

We received quite a few comments at the end of the survey that thanked us for putting it out and asking the community to think about these issues. We also had 99 people  – 34% of those who completed the survey – say that they would be interested in being interviewed about these issues as well. It was exciting to see so many of our community who wanted to engage with us and talk to us more about scholarly communication!


 

Interested in knowing more? Check out these stats:

survey completion
Percent of the survey completed by respondents.

 

Note: In the future, we will include all responses for questions, even if the respondent did not fully complete the survey. The following is meant to give a better idea of demographics for those who fully completed the survey (100% completion only). 

completed survey respondents
Breakdown of completed survey respondents.
completed survey numbers
Numerical breakdown of completed survey respondents.
age range
Age range of completed survey respondents.
schools.png
School affiliations of completed survey respondents.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s